First Parish

First Parish Commercial Services.

First Parish in Plymouth
19 Town Square
Located at the bottom of Burial Hill / top of Leyden St.

 

First Parish provides services such as weddings and tours to the public. Please call the office at (508) 747-1606 or email the office at office@firstparishplymouthuu.org

 

 

 

First Parish Church in Plymouth is the oldest continuous church in New England. We trace our origin back to the year 1606 when a group of dissenters from the Church of England banded together in Scrooby. Persecution forced the Scrooby congregation to flee England and, in 1608, the group settled in Leyden, Holland, under the leadership of their pastor, John Robinson.

In 1620 part of the Leyden congregation set sail aboard the Mayflower, seeking a permanent home in the New World. These pilgrims were seeking the freedom to worship according to the dictates of their own conscience.

In 1800 this church became Unitarian and is a member of the Unitarian Universalist Association formed in 1961.

 

 

Guided Tours of First Parish

firstparishchurchThis impressive 1899 granite structure, the fifth Meetinghouse on this site, was built using donated funds to honor the Pilgrim Founders. It has outstanding Tiffany stained glass windows illustrating the Pilgrim story. The sanctuary interior is of carved quarter-sawn oak and is one of the finest examples of hammer beam construction in the United States.

Tours are available through the winter months only by appt.

Regular tour days will begin again Memorial Day weekend 2012.

The congregation has a long tradition of religious freedom and faith that dates back to the pilgrim landing and beyond. We trace our origin back to the year 1606 when a group of dissenters from the Church of England banded together in Scrooby. In 1620 part of the Leyden congregation set sail aboard the Mayflower, seeking the freedom to worship according to the dictates of their own conscience in the New World.

 

A Tidbit about our Famous Meetinghouse Brought to you by Friends of First Parish Meetinghouse:

Hand-Carved Oak Pews

Hand-Carved-Oak-pews

The pews that line the Meetinghouse are made of century-old golden oak with hand-carved scallop shells. Scallop shells can also be found in the side windows of the meetinghouse and in stenciling and represent a religious journey or pilgrimage.  Different points lead to one place.